Welcome to NAME

Archives

Intensive Institutes

NAME’s annual Intensive Institutes offer extended focus on particularly critical issues and opportunities to work with noted NAME activists. The institutes are scheduled so that participants do NOT miss the general sessions. Additional fees and pre-registration are required.
Institutes can be “added-on” to existing registration through the on-line registration process. Space is limited.

Fees for institutes:
•  NAME the Change Sessions: $25 for members/ $49 for non-members
•  Afternoon Institutes: $49 for members/ $69 for non-members

•••

Weds, Nov. 5 – 2pm to 5pm
W1. Developing a Multicultural Education Course – Higher Education

This new interactive Intensive Institute is designed specifically for faculty who teach or wish to teach courses in multicultural education. The presenter has taught multicultural education for almost twenty years in workshop settings, traditional classroom settings, blended courses, and online courses. Join in discussions about resistant students, mono-cultural and mono-lingual students, balancing theory and practice, the struggles of online teaching and more. Content includes review of sample course syllabi, use of simulations, video, assignments and assessment.
Presenter:  William A. Howe, Past-President of NAME, CT Department of Education and University of Connecticut, Albertus Magnus College and Quinnipiac University.
Fee: $49 for members/ $69 for non-members

 •••

Weds, Nov. 5 – 2pm to 5pm
W2. Writing for Publication
This popular institute is designed to assist anyone interested in publishing in professional journals or other related publications in the field of multicultural education. Facilitated by experienced editors and writers, it is particularly beneficial for graduate students and junior faculty. During this interactive workshop, participants will learn about the process of writing for publishing from both a writer’s perspective as well as the editor’s perspective. Topics to be covered include getting started (selecting appropriate journals, turning dissertations into articles, etc.), the submission and review process, and the relationship of publishing to tenure. Participants should be prepared to share their ideas for articles. Participants will receive an extensive package of materials to support their work towards becoming published authors.

Presenters: Co- Editors, Multicultural Perspectives and ; and   Co-Editor, Multicultural Perspectives: Penelope L. Lisi, Central Connecticut State University, Ozlem Sensoy  Patricia Marshall,  and Co-President-elect of NAME; Dean, Western Washington University
Fee: $49 for members/ $69 for non-members

Thursday, 2pm to 5pm
T3. TEACHING TOLERANCE: The March Continues: Five Essential Practices for Teaching the Movement

This interactive session will explore five best practices and nine essential areas for teaching about the modern civil rights movement. Participants will work in small groups to turn reductionist or ineffective civil rights standards into a plan for rich and rigorous instruction. Exemplar lessons and curriculum resources will be modeled. 
Presenters: Sara Wicht,  Emily Chiariello, and June Christian, Teaching and Learning Specialiats, Teaching Tolerance
Fee: $49 for members/ $69 for non-members

 •••

Thurs, 2pm to 5pm
T4. Genderf*ck and Other Trans*Border Identity Formations

This session is tied to NAME’s 2014 Conference theme, “Fronteras through Multicultural Education: Con Comunidad, Cariño y Coraje” through it’s linking of identity and geography relative to the concept of borderlandsThe session highlights exclusionary educational practices that particularly negatively impact Trans* students through a review of critical perspectives on identity emanating from intersectional scholarship in queer studies, on gender identity and expression, and through border pedagogy that are most relevant for multicultural education today. This session also links the “terrain” of identity to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology to literally “map” Trans* identity formations.  This highly interactive session will be of particular interest to multicultural educators interested in understanding new Trans*Border-related nomenclature, and and its relevance to PK-12 classroom praxis. Presenters: Christine Clark, Kevin Higley, and Heather Whitesides, all from University Nevada—Las Vegas
Fee: $49 for members/ $69 for non-members

 •••

Thurs Nov 6 , 2pm to 5pm
T5.  CANCELLED.
Paul Gorski’s Reaching and Teaching Students in Poverty: An Equity Literacy Approach

•••

Fri, Nov. 7 – 10:00 am to 11:50am
F6. NAME the CHANGE Session: 
Writing for the Public/Accessing the Media: Countering the Conservative, Anti-NAME Dominance

Ask most people, and no one knows of social justice and multicultural education organizations or issues. But they are well aware of the rhetoric from the right against groups that promote equity concerns. Why? Folks on the right have successfully captured and maintained the news media’s attention, which have amplified their viewpoint. Effectively communicating the work of NAME requires understanding the rapidly evolving popular media. Communicating the importance of multicultural education to pre-K through 12 teachers, principals, parents and the public is essentially another cultural bridge we must successfully cross. This session led by a journalist who has shared this information all over the country will teach strategies, practices and techniques for engaging a wider audience for our work. The institute will focus on how to write and get published in newspapers, magazines, on websites, blogs and other venues. It also will present material on how to get news releases to the news media and be taken seriously instead of trashed. The strategies will include working with the local and national media to gain attention for events, the work of NAME and NAME members.
Presenter: Lewis Diuguid, Editorial Board member, Columnist at The Kansas City Star
Fee: $25 for members/ $49 for non-members

 •••

Fri, Nov. 7 – 10:00 am to 11:50am
F7. NAME the CHANGE Session:
PresenterWayne Au, Editor, Rethinking Schools, and Professor, University of Washington–Bothell
In this workshop participants will discuss writing about our practices as educators for the pages of Rethinking Schools specifically and wider audiences generally. Participants will spend time working on writing ideas and begin producing drafts of potential articles. This workshop is for anyone interested in writing about educational practices.

Fee: $25 for members/ $49 for non-members

 •••

FRIDAY Nov. 7, 2 to 5 pm
F8.STEMequity

Interest in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) is sweeping the nation, but STEM fields are not representative of the population as a whole. With massive shortages in STEM workers already apparent in the workforce, and more predicted for the future, we cannot wait any longer to remedy the achievement gaps that lead to this underrepresentation. This lively, interactive institute will explore causes and remedies for underrepresentation in STEM, ultimately focusing on strategies to support children’s achievement in math and science. Both Professional Development and STEM curricular approaches will be featured. Family Math, Family Science, and Family Engineering are among the models that will be demonstrated. Adaptable to numerous settings, this comprehensive process-oriented approach forges partnerships between school, home, and community that improve learning for all children, especially children of color and girls. Activities will focus on the language and methods of preK- 8th grade math and science, and demonstration of ‘hands-on’ learning that use inexpensive, familiar materials commonly found around the home.
Presenter: Marta Larson, Consultant, Ann Arbor, MI
Fee: $49 for members/ $69 for non-members

•••

Fri Nov 7 Afternoon – 3:00-6:00pm
F9. Decolonizing Education Institute

Decolonization is both an analytic and a desired future. In this vein, institute participants will analyze how urban / borderland schools and institutions are staked in settler colonialism; yet also imagine how decolonizing desires can reshape radical schooling efforts such as critical pedagogies, higher education access, and community empowerment. Because decolonization is specific to land, people, and historical realities, participants will comparatively discuss their own educational contexts of land, people, and institutional realities, alongside specific examples to be presented. The institute format will be a mix of presentations and participatory activities, including short readings, discussions, and creative research.
Presenter: K. Wayne Yang, University of California–San Diego
Fee: $49 for members/ $69 for non-members

•••

Sat Nov 8 Morning 10-11:50am
S10. NAME the CHANGE Session: Preparing Teachers for the N Word

What do we say when N!gga (er) is in our classrooms, hallways, practice fields, cafeterias. This session examines the history/impact of the N!gga (er) word, challenges participants’ personal and professional histories with the word,explores conversations for teachers and students on a book containing N!igga (er).
Presenter: Eddie Moore, Jr., The Privilege Institutes
Fee: $25 for members/ $49 for non-members

 •••

Sat Nov 8 Afternoon – 2 – 4:50pm
S11. Working with White Folks: Dismantling Barriers of Fear and Avoidance

This session demonstrates a conceptual framework and a process for engaging both white people and people of color in conversations about race. Participants will experience interactive strategies that minimize the rhetoric of shame and blame, and maximize the likelihood that real learning and collaborative action can occur. 
Presenter: Gary Howard, Gary Howard Equity Institutes

Fee: $49 for members/ $69 for non-members

 •••

Sat Nov 8 Afternoon – 2 – 4:50pm
S12. Developing a Multicultural Curriculum– PK-12 and Community Settings

Since 1995, more than 4,000 people have taken this nationally recognized program to learn how to create a multicultural curriculum.  Content will cover fundamental theory, definitions, goals, objectives and models.  Participants will learn a method for creating lesson plans that are multicultural.  Learning outcomes include how to prepare all students for a diverse workforce and a global economy; and how to increase student achievement through culturally responsive teaching.
Presenter:  William A. Howe, Past-President of NAME, CT Department of Education; University of Connecticut, Albertus Magnus College and Quinnipiac University

Fee: $49 for members/ $69 for non-members

 •••

Sat Nov 8 Afternoon – 2 – 4:50pm
S13. Schools in Context:  Teaching, Community and the Struggle for Quality Education

Public school advocates have claimed that charter schools start with a similar advantage over public neighborhood schools—that charter enrollment and expulsion practices make it more likely charters will end up with students who are already above standard.  As a result, the attainment level their students start with hides the curricular and instructional inferiority of charter schools when compared to public neighborhood schools.  What is needed is a measure that (1) considers the starting point of students in both types of schools, and then (2) measures the growth experienced by students in each system.

In 2013, public and charter school students across the city took the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) national assessment. Each child got an individual score to serve as a baseline. By calculating the difference between that score and the 2014 score, we can determine the amount of learning growth each child attained in the year between the exams.  Comparing student learning growth across schools provides us with a more accurate comparison of the effects of schools and school systems. The result: Public school students learned far more in one year than charter school students did, especially in reading.   In this presentation we review the overall results of the study and then examine how this plays out in one Chicago neighborhood (Albany Park) where public and charter schools are competing for students.  I also look at what this means for the achievement gap, as well as examine the reasons for the poor relative performance of charters.  Lastly, we comment on possible reasons that elective officials continue to support charter schools despite a growing evidence base pointing to their relative ineffectiveness. Presenters: David Stovall, University of IL-Chicago, and Troy LaRaviere, Principal, Chicago Public Schools