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“What DO I Call You People???” – Using Culturally Appropriate Language
Too often, through ignorance or bigotry, the use of language can be hurtful and perpetuate long-held prejudices. In our efforts to continue to become a more civilized society, it is critical that we take the time to educate ourselves on the power of language to either strain our relations or bring people together. Here we begin to gather some resources.

General
Books
Lesson Plans – K-12
Course Syllabi – College
Models of MCE

General

Teacher Certification

The Power of Words Curriculum
The Power of Words curriculum is about the language that captures the multiethnic temper of our times. Its lessons encourage us to explore the words used in the United States to label ethnic groups, women and sexual minorities and to examine the ways in which these words reveal our nation’s social landscape.The Power of Words offers standards-based lesson plans for use in language arts and social studies classrooms; most are appropriate for use in grades 9 and up. Many can be adapted for lower grades and across subject areas. From our friends at Teaching Tolerance.

Rwanda Peace Narratives Toolkit, appropriate for a variety of uses with middle and high school students, has been developed by The Center for Peace Building International. The Peace Narratives Toolkit’s goal is to share a world lesson of peace and reconciliation, focusing on the stories of young people who faced and coped with violent conflict, searching for paths to coexistence within their communities.The Toolkit includes translated narratives from young Rwandan genocide survivors and lessons plans around the topics and themes introduced their stories. The resource would facilitate teaching, for example, relative to personal narratives, world history/African studies, genocide studies, conflict resolution, and arts/drama/film.The Objectives of Project are to:
– Explore the realities of conflict and genocide through Rwandan history
– Reflect upon the connection of the survivors’ feelings and growth to students’ own life experiences
– Motivate students to become agents of positive change in their own communities
.

The toolkit can be downloaded at: www.cpbinternational.org/RwandaPeaceNarratives.pdf
The developers of the Rwanda Peace Narratives Toolkit are currently piloting it in schools in the Washington DC area. They are very interested in getting feedback from any educators who utilize the powerful resources. Contact The Center for Peace Building International with your input!

Stories Behind the Songs – Sometimes history can come across as a bunch of boring dates or a list of dead guys. That’s too bad. Because history is packed with surprising stories of people doing amazing, brave, as well pretty silly things—in other words, people just like people today! History is also full of music. Songs from the past are like recordings from long ago. They give us a sense of what our parents, grandparents, and extra-old ancestors feared, hoped for, and celebrated. The Kennedy Center’s educational arm–ArtsEdge.org provides great examples with primary and secondary source materials providing the stories behind significant American songs, including We Shall Overcome, The Battle Hymn of the Republic, Brother Can You Spare a Dime?, and This Land Is Your Land.

Wikipedia – An open-content encyclopedia in many languages. In the English version, started in January 2001, now working on 287094 articles. Learn how to edit pages, experiment in the sandbox, and find out how you can participate in the development of Wikipedia.

Political correctnesspolitically correct, and P.C. are terms that commonly refer, sometimes mockingly, to a social idea, perhaps even a movement, that is characterized by efforts to redress, primarily by the use of language, real or alleged discrimination on the basis of race, gender, disability or other criteria. One purpose behind this is to prevent the exclusion or the offending of people based upon differences or handicaps. Through repeated use of politically correct terms, its advocates hope to change people’s thought processes from containing biases to being more tolerant of differences. The new terms are often awkward substitutes for the original stark language concerning race or ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and disability status (physical or mental). It is also used by some to refer to those who support such political policies as affirmative action and multi-lingual education.

The Evolving Language of Diversity by Kathy Castania

Creating an Anti-Bias Learning Environment

Educators’ Preparation for Cultural and Linguistic Diversitymulticultural education position paper from AACTE.

Lessons for a Lifetime: Remembering September 11

Federal Resources for Educational Excellence (FREE)

Research Evidence – Five Standards for Effective Pedagogy and Student OutcomesFive Standards Evidence of Effectiveness technical report available online Mounting evidence indicates that use of the Five Standards significantly improves achievement for all students and is vital for students of cultural, racial, and linguistic minorities. The latest findings are reported in Research Evidence: Five Standards for Effective Pedagogy and Student Outcomes by Tharp et al. (2002). This report provides quantitative data as well as examples on the effects of the use of the Five Standards on student achievement.

Teaching About Being an Oppressor

A captivating article by Steven P. Shacht inspired by “Unpacking the Knapsack” by Peggy McIntosh. Schacht discusses how he is over privileged because, as a white male, he automatically gets a variety of benefits that women, people of color, lower classes, etc. need to work hard for.

Read this article if you have doubts that racism, sexism, classism, etc. still exist.

How To Tell People They Sound Racist

Jay Smooth is brief and refreshing in his tips, especially in this video. He essentially says that when a person says something racist (or ablest, heterosexist, classist, etc.) you need to focus on the hurtful comment, not any reflection it may have on the speaker’s personality.

Laci Green’s Youtube Channel

This girl is a genius. She gives great, concise, insightful, and often funny information on sex, politics, humanity, and living well.

Sample Anti-Bias and Diversity Lessons and Activities

University of Southern California Center for Multilingual/Multicultural Research

TIPS ON TEACHING AFRICAN-AMERICAN ADULTS by Margaret Shaw, Ed. D. Pennsylvania State University – These tips focus on teaching African-American adults from a cultural perspective. This teaching approach includes all the basic objectives of adult education but with a slightly differ­ent emphasis so that learning activities will have increased meaning for African-American adults. Teaching from a cultural perspective pays attention to the subject matter as for any adult student; however, the subject matter is contextual­ized to have meaning for the African-American adult. Teaching from a cultural perspective also pays attention to the developed knowledge structures, perceptual patterns, and the preferred processes of learning within that culture. It also pays attention to teachers and their cultural perceptu­al patterns as well as their effects on the teaching/learning process. Following are some tips for students, curriculum specialists, and teachers that may lead to better services for African-American adults.

Guidelines for Identifying Bias in Curriculum and MaterialsFrom the Safe Schools Coalition

Echoes and Reflections — a new multimedia curriculum on the Holocaust for high schools – For the first time, one comprehensive program delivers the pedagogical expertise of the Anti-Defamation League, Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation, and Yad Vashem. Rich with visual history testimony integrated into 10 multi-part lessons, this educational resource offers curriculum connections to contemporary issues of diversity, prejudice and bigotry, and modern-day genocide.
Echoes and Reflections
is a multimedia curriculum that was developed jointly by the Anti-Defamation League, Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation, and Yad Vashem.  It includes over two hours of testimony from survivors and other witnesses to the Holocaust, ten multipart lessons, an abundance of primary source materials, resources, timelines, a glossary, etc. Read more about this new resource at www.echoesandreflections.org

What Are Your Legal Obligations Regarding Student Sexual Orientation? This New Guide Provides Questions and Answers.Download the PDF
Alexandria, Va. — Oct 12 — A consortium of national organizations, under the leadership of the National School Boards Association (NSBA), has issued a resource document to help school leaders address legal issues surrounding students’ sexual orientation and gender identity.

Assessing Children’s Literature – from our friends at the ADL
Literature is a powerful vehicle for helping children understand their homes, communities and the world. Even before young children can read, family members, childcare providers and teachers read them stories about people in far away places, sometimes from the distant past and sometimes about people whose lives are similar to their own. The impressions and messages contained in these stories can last a lifetime

Building Community and Combating Hate: Lessons for the Middle School Classroom
Partners Against Hate is pleased to inform you of the existence and availability of two new and important resource tools in the fight against hate. Each publication is available for free download from Partners Against Hate at http://www.partnersagainsthate.com This resource is a compilation of lesson plans exploring four themes focused on (1) interpersonal communication/conflict resolution, (2) the escalation of hate and violence, (3) the consequences of scapegoating and bias in history, and (4) the rights, challenges, and responsibilities of living in a democracy

WHAT MAKES A GREAT TEACHER?
Teaching is one of the most complicated jobs today. It demands broad knowledge of subject  matter, curriculum and standards; enthusiasm, a caring attitude and a love of learning; knowledge of discipline and classroom management techniques; and a desire to make a difference in the lives of young people. With all these qualities required, it’s no wonder that it’s hard to find great teachers. Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his/her teacher. Read on to learn how to identify a great teacher and what to do if you have a problem with your child’s teacher.

Making the Grade: A Racial Justice Report Card
a new tool to assess how your schools measure up to racial equity standards. This easy-to-use computer program walks journalists, parents, students, or teachers through a series of research tasks. Making the Grade then produces an “A” through “F” grade and explains where the school or district is failing their responsibility to equal education.

The Southern Regional Education Board recently published “Standards for Online Professional Development: Guidelines for Planning and Evaluating Online Professional Development Courses and Programs”. The eleven standards include academic preparation of teachers, on-line teaching and learning, and guidance for costs for virtual schools. The eight page document is available here.

A Foot in Both Places: Culture & Community at the Crossroads of War – Interviews with Arab, South Asian, And Muslim Community Activists – A Foot in Both Places is an interactive educational toolkit, featuring stories, photographs, music, games and more. It is built around 25 interviews with Arab, South Asian, and Muslim community activists. It focuses on how communities have responded to the post–9/11 climate, and what types of alliances they have built to defend their civil rights and civil liberties. Also included is a comprehensive listing of resources and links for further study and action. This toolkit is designed for classroom or community use by faith communities, interfaith groups, educators, and activists concerned with issues of civil rights and civil liberties, immigrant rights, peace education, and anti-Arab racism and Islamophobia.

Creating an Anti-Bias Learning Environment

Educators’ Preparation for Cultural and Linguistic Diversity- multicultural education position paper from AACTE.

Lessons for a Lifetime: Remembering September 11

Federal Resources for Educational Excellence (FREE)

Research Evidence – Five Standards for Effective Pedagogy and Student Outcomes
Five Standards Evidence of Effectiveness technical report available online Mounting evidence indicates that use of the Five Standards significantly improves achievement for all students and is vital for students of cultural, racial, and linguistic minorities. The latest findings are reported in Research Evidence: Five Standards for Effective Pedagogy and Student Outcomes by Tharp et al. (2002). This report provides quantitative data as well as examples on the effects of the use of the Five Standards on student achievement.

Sample Anti-Bias and Diversity Lessons and Activities

University of Southern California Center for Multilingual/Multicultural Research

 

Books

You will also find outstanding multicultural education resources listed under NAME Awards. Click here to jump to the NAME Award recipients of past years!

Maggio, R. (1992). The Bias-Free Word Finder: A Dictionary of Nondiscriminatory Language. Boston, MA: Beacon Press.

Schwartz, M., and the Task Force on Bias-Free Language of the Association of American University Press. (1995). Guidelines of Bias-Free Writing. Bloomington, IA: Indiana University Press.

“The Color of Words: An Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Ethnic Bias in the United States,” by Philip H. Herbst and published by Intercultural  Press Inc. The Color of Words is about the shades of meaning in the English language that capture and give voice to the multiethnic temper of our times. It tells the stories of words used in the United States to label ethnic groups or talk about the social landscape of which they are a part

ADL Recommended Books – This list of children’s books is intended for educators, parents and other caregivers of early childhood and elementary aged children. Reading the children’s books listed on this site is an excellent way to reinforce themes addressed in A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE® Institute, ADL’s international anti-bias education and diversity training program. Reading multicultural literature has the potential to foster children’s understanding and respect for their own and others’ cultural groups, to develop empathy, and, in general, to begin the lifelong process of learning about multiple perspectives and experiences.

INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S DIGITAL LIBRARYLiterature is one of society’s means for exposing young hearts and minds to new and foreign ideas. Engaging stories help children grow intellectually and emotionally, understand who they are, and inspire them to explore the world around them. At a time when the quality of public education varies considerably across our country and the globe, the benefits of a well-stocked local library are obvious. Yet, not all children have access to an endowed library. Due to financial constraints not all libraries are created equal. The International Children’s Digital Library (ICDL) is a five-year project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to create a digital library of international children’s books. The materials included in the collection reflect similarities and differences in cultures, societies, interests, lifestyles, and priorities of peoples around the world. The collection’s focus is on identifying materials that help children to understand the world around them and the global society in which they live. It is hoped that through a greater understanding of one another that tolerance and acceptance can be achieved. The collection has two primary audiences. The first audience is children ages 3-13, as well as librarians, teachers, parents, and caregivers, who work with children of these ages. The second audience is international scholars and researchers in the area of children’s literature. http://www.icdlbooks.org/

HOW TO THRIVE AS A TEACHER LEADER – ASCD announces a new book designed to help every teacher who chairs a department, leads a committee, manages a team, coordinates a program, or mentors other teachers to accomplish basic leadership tasks with speed and precision. Filled with tips and how-tos that are left out of most teacher education courses and inservice programs, the guide covers formal and informal tasks that teacher leaders at every grade level are expected to know but rarely do. Read a sample chapter.

Multicultural Lesson Plans

Radical Math – resources for educators interested in integrating issues of social and economic justice into math curriculum and classes.

Diversity Within Unity:  Essential Principles for Teaching and Learning in a Multicultural Society- by James Banks

Diversity/Inclusive Teaching Tips - General rules to follow

Awesome Library

Educational Justice

Educational Resources and Lesson Plans

Effective Lesson Planning for English Language Learners

Lesson Plans for Teachers

Lesson Plans with a Multicultural Focus

Multicultural Lesson Plans and Resources

Movies, Race, and Ethnicity

Multicultural American West

Multicultural Art Lesson Plans

Multicultural Lesson Plans from Jefferson County Public Schools

Multi Cultural Ideas and Links

Multicultural Project Areas

PBS Teacher Resources

Social Studies Lesson Plans

Women and Social Movements

Multicultural Course Syllabi

Christine E. Sleeter - Dr. Christine E, Sleeter – College of Professional Studies, California State University Monterey Bay, winner of the 1994 Carl A. Grant Multicultural Research Award from the National Association for Multicultural Education

Porter Lee Troutman, Jr. – Dr. Porter L. Troutman Jr., Professor – University of Nevada, Las Vegas and one of the Founders of the National Association for Multicultural Education

Multicultural Education in a Pluralistic Society – Sixth Edition by Donna M. Gollnick and Philip C. Chinn – This website provides additional information for users of Multicultural Education in a Pluralistic Society, sixth edition by Donna M. Gollnick and Philip C. Chinn. To further enrich their learning, users will find Chapter Summaries, Multiple Choice, True/False, and Discussion Questions with which to test their knowledge of chapter content, as well as the Pause to Reflect, Ask Yourself, and Chapter Questions sections that give students short review questions to answer in essay format. Web Resources for each chapter offer links to many pertinent websites related to the material. Critical Incidents help users apply themes they’ve learned from each chapter by asking questions in the context of a brief case study, and Integration Activities give users resources and activities to complete that help broaden the scope of their understanding. * Donna Gollnick is a Past President of the National Association for Multicultural Education. Philip C. Chinn is a former Vice-President of the National Association for Multicultural Education.

MULTICULTURAL PERSPECTIVES IN EDUCATION – Class Instructor: Dr. Andrew Jackson, Sr., PhD in Multicultural Education, Penn State

Educating for Equity and Social Justice – Paul Gorski, Hamline University Graduate School of Education

Models of Multicultural Education

Elements of Multicultural Curriculum Design by Christine E. Sleeter

The Scope of Multicultural Education by Mary Stone Hanley

Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC)

 

NOTE: Thanks to Maria J. Botelho, Collaborative Teacher Education Program, School of Education at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Gina Boltz of Native Village, Linda Couchon of the Cornell University Cooperative Extension Diversity Website and Ellen H. Bettmann for their help with sources. … Please send further resources to bill@billhowe.org